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Blog to America


Content for Blog to America is completely generated by the readers. This site brings together individuals from around the world to post their opinions on the United States in the form of letters and comments. Our site aims to encourage global communication and create an international dialogue between America and the world. The most interesting of these letters and comments will be included in a future publication.


Letters from Americans are kept on the American Perspectives page.


Yfi from Iran on Freedom and World War II

Dear America,

I have never been to your shores, but I feel that I need to share with you the important role which your country (and all it stands for) has played in my life. I was born in Germany in 1969. My parents were both War children. They were 5 when the Allies marched into what was left of the Reich. Mum grew up in the British sector and has many heart-breaking memories, not only of being bombed out twice, of a brother in a concentration camp due to political activity and of seeing her father killed, but also of the occupation time, when British soldiers were none too kind to little German urchins. My father however, lived in the American Sector. His war time experiences were just as horrific, but the evil was over (according to him) when the 'Amis' rolled into the little town. Initially immensely fearful, the American soldiers won him over with smiles, chocolate and rides on tanks. He describes how he realized (even as a little boy) that his family had been lied to about the Americans - that they were fair and kind, not imperialistic and cruel. He learned elementary English hanging around America soldiers. His family began to receive CARE parcels packed in the US and sent to starving families in occupied Germany. For the first time in all of his life (born in 1939), my dad and his siblings had enough to eat and even some small luxuries. My dad's impressions and recollections have had a profound effect on my own opinion- not so much of America (as a political idea...too much abject nonsense has happened recently), but of the basis of American democracy and human rights. I know from Dad that military intervention is possible for all the right reasons. It does not have to do with oil, etc. My German family never saw the Americans as anything other than liberators and enablers. I still believe in you and I will teach my children to do so also. God bless America.


About the Author:

Name: Yfi
Age: 38
Country: Australia
Gender: Female
Occupation: Teacher
Experience With US: Never Visited the United States

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2 Responses to “Yfi from Iran on Freedom and World War II”

  1. # Anonymous caitlyn

    Hi!
    This was very interesting insight in to the past. thanks for this. it is nice to know we helped a foreign country at least at some point. I hope that the american soldiers today are just as kind as they were back then. I know many of the soldiers who have joined faced poverty or troubles in their lifetime and that is why they joined so hopefully they understand what the children and families in other countries are going through and are willing to help. please write more about your own personal experiences/thoughts.  

  2. # Blogger niki yokota

    hello from japan!
    my parents also received those CARE parcels from USA after WW2.
    mom says there was no food but beautiful buttons, so girls were fascinated :)
    she's never seen such beautiful thingie before, so she thought america is such a great country.
    thanks and have a nice weekend!  

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